Poo bag holders, on the go!

A cute little bag to carry a roll of poo bags on a key ring. This is a simple variation on the tissue holders I have made by the dozen over the years. Thanks Lorrie Nunemaker for the idea.

Cut outer fabric at 6” by 4 1/2” and lining at 5” by 4 1/2” then cut a 2” square of either fabric. Turn the little square into a loop for the key ring by creasing it in half then folding two sides in to the crease and then folding it again so you have a strip that is 1/2” wide with the raw side edges encased. Sew down the strip (I usually sew two lines to make it look tidier)

Follow the tissue holder instructions: sew the short sides of the two fabric pieces – right sides facing- together then flip right sides out and press so that there is an equal amount of lining at either side. See picture below.

With outer facing up, fold the sides to the middle so they just touch or overlap, and pin. Tuck the loop piece inside where the sides are touching. Sew the top and bottom raw edge and then zig zag those raw edges to tidy them up.

What changes this is to Box the corners with a 3/8” seam before turning right sides out.

The wider lining fabric should just peek out …

Snuffle mat, to slow doggy feeding

Love this simple home made craft. It is designed so that the feeder of a greedy dog sprinkles biscuits/kibble/dry food on the mat giving the dog a challenge to find and retrieve the food.

Simply made with an inexpensive sink mat (mine Addis 30 cm approx square) with lots of drainage holes in it. Spend 20 minutes cutting a metre of fleece into 2.5 x 10 cm ish strips. Then sit in front of the tv knotting the fleece through the holes. Thread a strip up and down through adjacent holes and tie a single, simple knot to secure each strip until every hole is filled.

I used a thick fleece so stopped when the back looked like this. I finished by threading and stitching a 20 cm strip of fleece through a corner hole to make a hanger. This mat is washable and easy to make.

Mini oven/coal mitts

A ‘use what you have’ project as I couldn’t bear to throw out some wadding scraps when decluttering.

I made a rough pattern of an oval about 9 inches tall and 6 inches wide. (That is big enough to grab a small log or oven dish.) I cut out four ovals of fabric and one piece of wadding. Two ovals of fabric were cut in half widthways to make the pockets.

Each of the pairs of halves was pinned right sides facing and stitched along the straight edge to make two shapes like this…

Then the pieces were stacked in the following order : wadding, complete piece face up, pocket pieces face up, complete piece face down. Carefully pinned together I stitched around the edge leaving a big turning gap towards the bottom of the oval.

After turning right sides out, flip the pockets inside out and stitch closed the turning gap, then flip them back the right way and you are done.

Heat transfer vinyl

Remnants from a ‘remake the outdoor blinds’ project have been transformed, thanks to heat transfer vinyl …

This premium vinyl is much better than the economy version I have used before and I am surprised how well it melds into the canvas fabric. Let us see how the boat flag survives its outdoor life.

The other projects created from this crafty session with the trusty scan n cut (the whale is a standard supplied svg) will remain a Christmas surprise for the lucky few!

Transparent gift bags

Use what you have for quick make bags…

I have a roll of book covering plastic doing nothing in my stash, so cut rectangles from it and headed to the sewing machine

I folded copy paper (yes I also have a lot of coloured copy paper to use up) over the short ends and stitched it in place with a long zig zag.

The covered ends were folded together and the open sides zig zagged together to make a bag. I even boxed the bottom of the bigger one shown but am not sure it was worth the effort.

Two tips: use an old blunt needle as the plastic will ruin a new needle and long stitch lengths will minimise problems with the plastic slipping.

Washable Bowl cover

Easy project, use lightweight cotton.

Cut a circle around the intended bowl two inches away from the rim. I use pinking shears to avoid fraying

Press over a hem of about an inch (lots of tucks and folds).

Sew around the hem. This creates a channel for the elastic. Leave a gap of a couple of inches.

Cut elastic an inch longer than a snug fit length around the bowl. Stick a safety pin through the elastic and thread it around the channel. Fix the safety pin through the other end of the elastic to check the fit. If ok, Zig zag over the overlapped elastic and finally stitch up the gap in the channel.

Sleep masks

 

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This is a simple pattern to make for yourself and a quick, simple sew too.

Sketch a mask shape on paper, cut it out and hold it over your eyes to check the overall size. Best to make it slightly too big than too small and to have a flattish top and a more marked indent at the bottom where it sits on the bridge of your nose.

Fold the shape in half and trim to make it symmetrical.

Pin your paper on to two pieces of cotton (or fabric suitable to rest on your eyelids) and cut around leaving a 1/2” seam allowance, then pin the paper on some felt (or batting) and cut around that more tightly so your fabric outers are bigger than the felt

Stack the fabric with the two outsides facing and then put the felt on top, I stuck my felt in place lightly with a few dabs of fabric glue

Cut a piece of elastic that is long enough to go round the back of your head from outside eye socket to other outside eye socket. Place the elastic with about an inch sticking out over each side of the fabric stack and pin each end (this is enough to make the elastic stretch without being too tight).

Sew around the mask leaving a gap for turning (I left mine at the flat top), if your elastic is thin it might be worth sewing and reversing at each edge as you go over it.

Turn fabric out and poke out any caught seams before top stitching all the way round- this closes your turning gap and further strengthens the elastic fastening

I decorated mine with exaggerated eyelashes using a pearl pen (don’t think it is waterproof but twas a quick finish)