Shower soap pockets

8d634539-153f-40c2-89d9-ccb7d7f5b1c7.jpeg

A neat way to use soaps without getting the shower scummy.

Have you lots of soaps in the house although you use shower gel these days? Here is a quick sew to help use them up…

Cut a strip of towelling (or flannel) that is two inches wider than the soap bars you have to use up and three times longer. I cut my towelling so that one edge was ready hemmed, otherwise sew a rolled hem along one width.

Now fold the towel strip in thirds and then ease the folds out to make an envelope shape just bigger than a soap bar. The hemmed edge should be inside the overlap, ready for sewing

Next cut a length of cord to form a hanging loop. Fold the cord in half with the ends sticking outside one side and pin the loop inside so it doesn’t get caught up in your seam sewing

Sew  both open sides with a quarter inch seam allowance,  then turn the envelope inside out so the hemmed fold is now outside and the hanging  loop is showing and you have a little packet to tuck your soap bar in…

After a few showers when the soap has been dispersed and the towel is nicely soapy you can launder and/or tuck in another soap bar … you might even use up those hotel soaps you keep collecting!

Pyramid pouch

Easy zip sew.

fabric 10” x 5” with matching lining piece and batting or fleece, zip at least 5” long

optional 4×2” fabric folded lengthwise in quarters and top stitched to make loop

method;

1. fix fleece/batting to outer by fusing or quilting

2. Pin zip between one short end of outer ( pretty side of fabric facing top of zip) and lining fabric  and then sew in place using zipper foot. Repeat other short end to form a tube.

3. turn fabric tube with outer side showing and top stitch either side of zip to keep fabric away from the teeth

4. switch to normal foot, turn tube inside out with zipper positioned half way, if using pin loop inside and sew bottom edge of tube closed then trim seam close – also trimming excess zip – then zig zag over seam edge to tidy

5. twist fabric so zip is the side of tube. Pin or clip remaining raw edge and open the zip (or you won’t be able to turn fabric) then straight stitch, trim seam close to stitch- cutting off zip excess again- then zig zag up to, but not across, zip teeth

6. turn right sides out.

Done!

Curved zips and French seams

A learning project.

following the instructions from a borrowed fat quarter project book this was designed to be a pencil case but will now hold sewing notions as it isn’t quite good enough to give

the zip was hand basted to the curved seams and should have been hem stitched but I cheated and top stitched it with my zipper foot, I then put bag inside the lining and attempted to top stitch again over the same line, no joy but it doesn’t show tooo much

the box bottoms were French seamed which makes sense for this sequence of construction – and for the intended pencil case use and abuse of the lining, but can’t see myself abandoning my simpler form of zip bag making permanently

and the fabric was a page from an upholstery samples book that was scavenged for me, if just cotton might have needed quilting or stabilising

Zipping along

A bargain bundle of zips has inspired me to go for it and make a set of zip closed bags in different styles. As long as you remember to put pretty side of outer fabric up, top side of zipper facing it down and pretty side of lining facing down to make the zip sandwich lining it works.

The zipper foot has been out a lot and if I were more particular, reckon I could do them more tidily.

I put tabs on the end of some the zips to make the seams less bulky as I advanced, but these simple quilted make up bags with boxed bottoms are my favourites.

 

‘It looks shop bought’ beanie hat

Maybe not the most flattering hat but certainly one of the warmest.

made from fleece – that ikea throw seems never ending

loads of tutorials you can follow but it is a simple sew:

essentially draw your pattern as a rectangle with the long side measuring the circumference of the wearers head and the short side being half of the distance measured ear to ear ( plus brim and whatever length of fringe you want)

add seam allowances to long and short sides before cutting a double layer of fleece. I chose to have inner and outer the same fleece but contrast works well

cut the fringe to your chosen length along one long side then sew the other long side together

sew all the short sides together, stop just short of the fringe, to form a tube then turn inside out so the seams are hidden

do a decorative top stitch around the non fringed long side, bear in mind that this is on the brim so the bobbin side of your top stitch will be on display

turn the brim up and stand the hat on a table

gather the fringe in a bunch in your hand as though about to form it in a pony tail and tie a thin off cut of fleece around the bunch. Trim the off cut so it blends into the bunch

wear with panache!

 

Quick doggy bandana

Just two minutes to make and sooo cute.

Cut a square of fabric so that the diagonal is the same length as your  dog’s collar. Fold the fabric, right sides together, on the diagonal and press. Unfold the fabric and leave right side down.

At either end of the diagonal and fold a triangle about 5cm back to the middle so when you refold on the diagonal you get this shape, albeit inside out

sew the raw edges from just below one side fold round to just below the other and then turn right sides out through one of the gaps

done , just thread the collar from gap to gap and it is ready for wearing

if you want a more tailored finish you can run a line of stitching parallel to the top fold to create a channel for the collar

if you have a friend with a posh sewing machine why not add a little monogram or name as here …

Heat transfer vinyl

Much easier than I expected

I bought the vinyl from Tunnel  Vision and downloaded the visual from lovesvg.com before adding the personalised text on the ScanNCut. I then flipped the virtual visual to give a mirror image and put the vinyl shiny side (ie carrier side) down on the cutting mat before cutting with blade 4 and pressure 1.

the excess vinyl was peeled off the carrier and the remainder (the vinyl I wanted) placed dull side down on the T-shirt (peacocks) and ironed to fix it.  Once cooled the carrier sheet peels off leaving just the image in place.

now, what else can I cover in vinyl?

 

Faux Appliqué book jacket

A corporate note book of quality paper now wrapped in a jacket to keep it safe.

I backed some floral fabric with heat and bond, cut out the flowers then ironed them on a rectangle of denim. I then stitched over the flowers to give a loose quilting effect.

I hemmed the denim so that the height of the fabric matched the book but the width was about six inches wider than the book when opened flat. I then folded matching ends around the cover to make tight fitting flaps. These were slowly top stitched, top and bottom, quite a few layers of denim now, then the book was bent back on itself to slide into place.

Tip: make snug as the material will stretch for a tight fit which is better than bagging.i

Handbag accessories kit, from just one fat quarter

A batch of mini sews, together make a little handbag set

first a round earbud holder, two 4″ circles of outer fabric and two of lining, a 2″X 1.75″ strip folded to make a tab and a 5″ zip.

next a mini tissue holder: a 7″ X 6″ piece of fabric and a 8.5″ X 6″ for the contrast lining

then a loyalty card holder: 4 pieces of 4.75″ X 6.75″ fabric ( one of them interfaced) and one piece of .75″ wide elastic about 5″ long

and a glasses case that takes two 7″ X 4.5″ pieces of fabric and lining in two 7.5 X 4.5″ pieces, both outer pieces interfaced

finally ( not pictured) a lip balm key ring holder 1.75″ X 8″ outer and the same of lining

all sews from popular tutorials and covered in earlier posts – only the earbud holder is new here

Scraps leftover  from the fat quarter (which was actually a freebie from an upholstery fabric samples book)  and lining from the spares box so just the zip to purchase for the next set I make.