Lavender tub tea

Some of the french lavender that my sister harvested has been turned into bath salts thar won’t clog the plug hole.

Fill-your-own tea bags were stuffed with  a mixture of dried lavender and dead sea bath salts.

I searched for some lavender themed paper for the packaging but this was the closest I had in my huge supply pile. The reverse of this paper is however lavender polka dots so the trimmings were used to make banner ended tags for the bag ties.

 

 

Co ordinated gift bag and tag, so simple

I bought a bundle of brown food bags from the catering supplies shop for Christmas and duly stuck on panels and greetings in red, green and gold. But eighteen months on I still have plenty left, so have decorated a few simply ready to pop gifts in.

I used a stencil panel which fitted the bag front perfectly so used all the patterns rather than re aligning one of them.

I dabbed some distress ink- evergreen bough- on to a craft sheet and rubbed the ink through the stencil with a piece of cheap bathroom ‘sponge’. The back was also stencilled the same way.

The gift card and flower were cut from craft card with the scan n cut, the same distress ink rubbed on the edges of the flower and stamped on the tag. The message is ‘a gift for you’ stamped repeatedly on the diagonal, so it can be used for many occasions.

Distress ink or sepia browns work brilliantly on craft and for more masculine versions I am using rosettes rather than flowers.

Inside is a sheet of tissue paper ready to wrap a goody from the present drawer. Even so this will store almost flat until needed.

Brooch holder

I love vintage brooches and try to wear them on jackets often

i have turned their storage into a display with this project

a piece of corduroy and contrast linen which was three inches longer and wider were sandwiched (right sides OUT) around some batting so that the corduroy was centered on the bigger fabric giving an equal border.

the border was pressed in half and then folded over the edge of the cord and pressed agin then pinned in place, creating the look of bias binding

I top stitched around the frame that was created (twice, once at the crease and once on the outer edge to sharpen it up).

the corners were folded as hospital corners on a bed with the long edges on top, to create a mitre effect but these were left unsewn so I could poke a curtain rod through the channel created when I sewed the frame

I threaded cord through the convenient hole in each end of the slim metal curtain rod (an adjustable one designed for net curtains) -and knotted it to secure it

Serious cards

Beautiful papers from Craftwork Cards Antiqued and Chinoiserie pads were used to make some serious cards for ‘thinking of you’ messages

I used the scan n cut to create a decoupage effect with the water lilies (very impressed with the direct cut feature now I have tried it) and the trellis strip (a border from the pattern library) Continue reading

Quick photo stands

 

 

Want to display some photographs or cards but don’t have any frames spare? Head for the recycling box and use old cardboard for a quick fix.

I covered my card with pretty paper before cutting. I used my scan n cut to get a neat shape but scissors would work.

I then creased the shape against  a ruler to get the fold

adapt for your photos but aim For a width much wider than the photo so, once the support is creased, the photo can lean backwards rather than be too upright

 

Wall hanging note pads

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A craftwork cards Leisure kit contained the greyboard apron shaped cut outs so I have covered them with paper and die cuts from the kit, made pockets as pen holders and attached post it note pads with red liner tape

on one I took part of a memo block and covered it in paper to make a note pad

to finish I stuck ribbon scraps to make the handles and found some mini pegs to clip on the sides as receipt holders

little Mothering Sunday gifts, done!

Spring flower wreath

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I love how this was made from bits and pieces…

The cardboard box was cut into a ring doughnut shape using a craft knife around a dinner and side plate as templates. Honestly, the finished piece looks as good as a bought polystyrene ring would.

The ring was then wrapped with strips of burlap to give a bit of dimension and cover the card. Any plain fabric, canvas or even paper would do. I then wrapped lace effect cord on top of the burlap at about 10 centimeter spacing with about 20 cm spare at the end, which I pinned through the burlap to create a hanger.

You could use a longer loop for hanging if you wanted your cord to show and garden string looks good on burlap if you don’t have a long enough piece of cord. If you tie shorter pieces of string together, glue your decorations over the knots.

Pre cut, die cut flowers from a craftwork cards beau paper kit were stuck on with hot glue and supplemented with flowers cut on the scan n cut from the same paper pack.  I found putting the flowers on the inner and outer of the ring face added more dimension.

l added  ‘candi’ to the flower centre as a bit of detail,  but the waste from the office hole punch would work, as would beads or buttons if you like more frill effects.

When you feel it looks full enough, hang it up to check from every angle and fill in the gaps, as fuller is better to plump up the paper.

The beauty if this is that the theme and colours could change according to the paper you have –  from a glittery festive to a ‘natural’ palette.

 

Scan n cut snowflake garland/paper bunting

img_0185I followed a scan n cut you tube idea to create some home made decor this year. A modern version of paper chains!

For a Christmas themed garland you will need to cut out an assortment of paper snowflakes in different sizes.  I used a selection of papers and wish I had chosen doubled sided stuff as the garland twists a little in use.

if you don’t have a cutting machine folding the paper and hand cutting is an option if you have the time (or child labour!)

at the sewing machine pull a long tail of thread through then sew a long straight stitch through the centre of the first flake. (I used a white thread as most of the papers were pale or had white in but a contrast thread in a decorative stitch might be fun).

Be brave, go straight off the end of the flake and sew a few stitches in the gap before you put the next snowflake through. This creates a chain for your garland. You can overlap a few flakes or stitch a small one on top of a larger one as well.

Continue for the length you wish and leave a long tail of thread at the end for tying.

Easy to recreate for Valentines, Spring, Easter, Birthday, Halloween or Anniversary versions  …

Tip: remember that paper will blunt your machine needle

Papier-mâché experiment

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A charity shop papier-mâché kit find motivated me to try bowl making… the kit suggested moulding the paper pulp provided around semi inflated balloons but my balloons were perished (the kit had probably been lingering in the shop for a while ) so I wrapped two bowls in cling film before moulding on the moistened pulp.

Pulp was much faster and less messy than tearing up squares of paper and pasting with glue as we did at school.

however, it was harder to get a level surface with pulp and when dry was rock hard, so when I tried to pull the bowls from the mounds they lost a little of their shape.

metallic finish paint to the rescue! Haven’t a clue about brand or colours as it came in the kit, but thre blues and the gold were lovely and I have saved the dregs for painting another box one day

Conclusion, my dexterity is not good enough to gift these bowls but I am glad I tried my £1.50 experiment. if I repeated the exercise would decoupage the finished bowls to distract from the flaws.