Heat transfer vinyl

Much easier than I expected

I bought the vinyl from Tunnel  Vision and downloaded the visual from lovesvg.com before adding the personalised text on the ScanNCut. I then flipped the virtual visual to give a mirror image and put the vinyl shiny side (ie carrier side) down on the cutting mat before cutting with blade 4 and pressure 1.

the excess vinyl was peeled off the carrier and the remainder (the vinyl I wanted) placed dull side down on the T-shirt (peacocks) and ironed to fix it.  Once cooled the carrier sheet peels off leaving just the image in place.

now, what else can I cover in vinyl?

 

Clean and simple Christmas cards


I love making clean and simple cards, these use scraps from the seemingly everlasting Docrafts Folk Christmas kit.

I am trying to use it up before I let myself buy anymore paper but there is still lots still to work with.

I used an image from my scan n cut inbuilt library to cut 11 trees, each cut 2 cm high and mounted on small foam pads, so easy – 10 for the front and one for the insert.

I reckon this would work as well with a punch maybe in star or holly shapes if you didn’t have trees …

Here is a quick video on how to diy an insert for a basic card blank. Let me know what you think of my video efforts …

Wine glass tags

I ve made sets of wine glass tags today, using up Christmas paper and ribbon scraps. Feels good to have some mini gifts made ready.

I cut bauble shapes 65mm wide on the scan n cut and welded a central circle 17mm in the middle to create the gap for the stem.

To fit the tag around the Stem, I cut a slash from edge to centre (by hand as it was quicker than going to the software to set it up) and threaded scraps of ribbon through the bauble tops.

I added stickles to some of the less decorative papers but for a disposable mini gift, they really weren’t necessary.

In some sets I added napkin holders, (from scan n cut canvas projects , just a strip of paper with angled slashes at either end to loop round a serviette) with Christmas elements added to make a little Christmas buffet kit.

Presented in vellum envelopes, these would make a great craft fair goody. How much would one charge for a dozen tags in a set though? though

Personalised cushion

A unique creation made for a particular person!

aiming for a 15″ cushion I cut 3 x 16″ rectangles of red base material, one for my front and two for the back panel

For the decoration I filled a 12″ white fabric panel with heat and bond backed fabric shapes (cut on scan n cut from basic shapes library) and ironed them in place when I was happy with the layout. I then satin stitched around each shape to complete the panel.

I cut four strips of 2″ wide brown fabric – aiming for a wood frame effect and sewed them around the panel then ironed under the raw edge and stitched the whole onto my red front rectangle

to make up the cushion I folded 2″ under and under again on each of the back panels and top stitched the turned hem in place. I put the finished front piece face up and laid the back panels outside down on top so that the hems created overlapped in the centre. With lots of pins to keep everything square, I then sewed a half inch seam around all four sides.

turn inside out, press, job done!

Up cycle peg bag

scan n cut to decorate my tablecloth to peg bag project

the old oilcloth tablecloth has been taking up space in my fabric pile and all I can think of using it for is peg bags, any ideas?

I used a smallish plastic hanger ( note to self remember to keep hangers when next buying stuff in m&s as stash now depleted) and traced around the width of the hanger on the reverse of my oilcloth. I gave myself a half inch seam allowance and some wriggle room as the oilcloth doesn’t stretch.

The fabric length was cut at one and a half times the planned length of the bag (this gave me the back and folded up to make the bottom of the bag front.  When this piece was cut I folded it in half lengthwise to check it was symmetrical

To get the top front of the bag a separate piece of fabric was cur to match the width and shape of the back piece but length to just more than half of the planned bag size.

I planned the cutting  so the cut pieces finished on the bias bound edge of my tablecloth. This saved a hemming step. (That is why the right edge of my front does a little bend in the picture, I thought it would look stylish, actually it just looks wobbly).

The two pieces were stitched wrong sides together leaving a small gap to put the hanger through. I then Turned them  right sides out and creases were finger smoothed out (even a cool iron melted a prototype).

I cut shapes from external use vinyl on the scan n cut to decorate (and cover the iron damage on my prototype) and trust the project will enjoy a good second life somewhere

 

No sew appliqué

scan n cut with heat and bond made this a doddle

this old pillow sis in the dog basket I made some while back. It needs an upgrade and I wanted to practice my scan n cut fabric cutting technique in it. The pillow and case are standard ones recycled to the dog bed so a bit of no sew appliqué does the upgrade and helps me practise for other projects.

simple instructions

iron heat and bond onto a piece of lightweight cotton. Mine was about 10″ by 6″ , I chose plain black because of the type style bit white on a patterned pillowcase  would work as well

peel off the paper backing and press on the scan n cut mat, set blade to 4, pressure and speed to  4 , let the machine cut out the design then peel fabric from the sheet

position the design on the ironed pillowcase, I used a ruler to line the letters up – I forgot I have some transfer tape to try out

when in desired position, cover with a cloth and hot iron to seal in place

Cutting fabric on the scan n cut

I have struggled to get the settings right, but may finally have sorted fabric cutting on  the scan n cut

cut speed four, blade four, pressure four on light cotton that has had heat n bond or bondaweb fused on the back and the paper peeled off i.e. stuck wrong side down directly on the mat

the fabric peeled easily off from the mat and was just ironed on to the suedette drawstring bag: hot iron- no steam and with an ironing cloth for protection

so here I have decorated some glasses bags in a festive style so they can be given another life as gift bags later this year

 

Bookmark bonanza

Bookmarks galore…

using up my pile of peel offs (well making a dent in it), I laminated some words and cut out tag shapes with the scan n cut, then embossed to give the laminate texture and hide the air bubbles.

I stamped on one with stazon ink but didn’t much like the effect. And then I tore some thin coloured paper in strips and collaged more peel offs on both sides of the paper before laminating.

and I got a chance to try my new crop-a-dile to set some of my eyelets stash too – what a canny crafter I am today!

I also made a corner bookmark which is another great way to use up a patterned paper hoard. That is simply a 13cm square scored diagonally, corner to corner, to make four triangles. One of the triangles is then cut out and the the resulting three triangles folded and glued to make the corner. I matted up extra layers to add stability and sandwiched in some ribbon.

and to those who think bookmarks are a thing of the past, I refer you to Stephen Fry’s quote that bookmarks are as much threatened by the Kindle as stairs are by escalators.

Co ordinated gift bag and tag, so simple

I bought a bundle of brown food bags from the catering supplies shop for Christmas and duly stuck on panels and greetings in red, green and gold. But eighteen months on I still have plenty left, so have decorated a few simply ready to pop gifts in.

I used a stencil panel which fitted the bag front perfectly so used all the patterns rather than re aligning one of them.

I dabbed some distress ink- evergreen bough- on to a craft sheet and rubbed the ink through the stencil with a piece of cheap bathroom ‘sponge’. The back was also stencilled the same way.

The gift card and flower were cut from craft card with the scan n cut, the same distress ink rubbed on the edges of the flower and stamped on the tag. The message is ‘a gift for you’ stamped repeatedly on the diagonal, so it can be used for many occasions.

Distress ink or sepia browns work brilliantly on craft and for more masculine versions I am using rosettes rather than flowers.

Inside is a sheet of tissue paper ready to wrap a goody from the present drawer. Even so this will store almost flat until needed.